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Title: TDB_15_2

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0BV7DQR

Creator(s) Christopher R. Esposito

Abstract: TDB-15-2: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant sea-level rise rate of 0.25 mm/hr, and variable forcings of water and sediment. After run hour 300, water discharge alternated between 0.14 L/s and 0.45 L/s, and sediment discharge alternated between 0.00014 L/s and 0.00045 L/s. Prior to run hour 300, water discharge was 0.17 L/s, and sediment discharge was 0.00017 L/s. Experiment used a strongly cohesive sediment that had a wide grain size distribution with a median diameter of 65 microns. Total experiment run time was 733 hr, variable discharge began after hour 300. Experiment was paused every 1.1 hours for data collection. After variable flow was initiated, the following data were collected during each 1.1 hr cycle: -Overhead photo during low flow conditions -Overhead photo during high flow conditions -Overhead photo during experiment pause while delta top was dry. -Topographic scan during high flow conditions. -Topographic scan during pause/dry conditions. Data Files: Folder "TDB_15_2 Original Data" contains overhead raw overhead photographs (.jpg) and scans (point cloud .xyz). Each row of the point cloud contains the following data: [row col X Y Z R G B]; Folder "TDB_15_2_Results and Processed Data" contains overhead photograph and scan data gridded to a 5mm x 5 mm grid. Gridded data begins at hour 535, after the final scanner physical location was established. RGB color data included in the "Scans_Gridded" folder was collected with the scanner, at the same time as topographic (Z) data. All length data (X, Y, Z) are in meters. All colors (R, G, B) are in intensities from 1 to 255. Colors in gridded data sets may be non-integers because of the interpolation process. A value of NaN indicates no data in that grid cell. TDB_15_2_BasinDimensions.png shows the dimensions of the experimental entrance condition, and orients the coordinate system. TDB_15_2_RunTimeConversions.xlsx shows the conversion between run hours and run cycles.

Published: from Esposito Dissertation Data to
sead-int
on Aug 2, 2018 9:36:38 PM

Title: Steady and transient sand bedform evolution at Clear Run, North Carolina, September 2009

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0GM85FG

Creator(s) Raleigh L. Martin

Abstract: The evolution of sand bedforms through time was observed through time-lapse overhead camera imagery at Clear Run, a small, sand-bedded stream in Wilmington, North Carolina, USA. These observations were made as part of a larger study of "hyporheic" (i.e., surface-subsurface) solute and fine particle exchange through the injection and tracking of tracer solutes and particles in the stream channel. In particular, two scenarios were considered for observing hyporheic exchange and associated bedform evolution: (1) steady background "base" flow conditions, and (2) time-varying "flood wave" conditions associated with the opening of an artificial dam upstream of the observation section on the stream. The overall study is described in Harvey et al. (2012, Journal of Geophysical Research 117, G00N11, doi:10.1029/2012JG002043). This dataset contains processed images for the steady and transient bedform evolution observed at Clear Run on September 18, 2009. The images provided here were captured with a Nikon D5000 camera looking downward from approximately 2.5m above the stream bed. Time-lapse images were captured every 30 seconds. The images were rotated to align with the stream channel geometry and cropped to remove the stream banks and other non-bedform components of the image. Steady-flow images were further processed to normalize for variation in lighting. Specific details for each set of images are provided here: (1) Steady base flow observations (individual .jpg images contained in folder "ClearRunSteady_CroppedRotatedNorm") Images numbered 12 to 588 (577 total images, numbers increasing through time) were captured at 30-second intervals during steady base flow conditions on 18 September 2009, starting at 11:00:32 AM local time (Eastern Daylight Time). In all images, flow is from left to right. The vertical (spanwise) extent of the images is 2664 pixels (175.0 cm), and the horizontal (streamwise) extent is 1520 pixels (99.9 cm), based on a conversion factor of 0.0657 cm/pixel. (2) Transient flood wave observations (individual .jpg images contained in folder "ClearRunFlood_CroppedRotated") Images numbered 1 to 300 (300 total images, numbers increasing through time) were captured at 30-second intervals during the artificially-induced dam-release flood wave on 18 September 2009, starting at 4:08:32 PM local time (Eastern Daylight Time). In all images, flow is from left to right. The vertical (spanwise) extent of the images is 2904 pixels (201.8 cm), and the horizontal (streamwise) extent is 1612 pixels (112.0 cm), based on a conversion factor of 0.0695 cm/pixel. An additional metadata file ("ClearRun_metadata.xlsx") provides timing information for each of the photos in the steady and transient flow collections.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jul 31, 2018 4:30:44 PM

Title: Transient Flows Unimodal sediment

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0S180MK

Creator(s) Colin B. Phillips

Abstract: Sediment transport experiments with variable water discharge conducted at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota. These experiments explore the effects of flood hydrograph shape on bed-load transport dynamics. The dataset is composed of over 200 individual experimental runs with varying discharge and sediment feed rates for a unimodal sediment mixture with a median size of 7 mm. Raw data included in this data set for each experimental flood includes time series of varying water level and force on the load cell due to the accumulating sediment flux. These data are processed into time series of water depth, dimensional and dimensionless stress, sediment mass, and sediment flux for each run. Accompanying these data are topographic scans of the sediment bed of 1 mm vertical and spatial resolution.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jul 6, 2018 1:03:57 PM

Title: Diamond Creek Repeat Multibeam Data

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M02J6904

Creator(s) Kate Leary

Abstract: Bed Elevation grids from March and July 2015 sampling missions upstream of the Diamond Creek USGS sediment gage. Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park. Matlab scripts used to calculate bedload flux from RMB, SB, and MSB bed elevation profiles. Data and scripts provided to carry out the methods of Leary & Buscombe "Practical Guidelines for Estimating Sand Bedload in Rivers by Tracking Dunes", submitted to Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, Feb. 2017. This work was funded by the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program administered by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Geological Survey Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center. Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. government. Questions regarding this dataset? Contact Kate Leary at learykcp@asu.edu

Published: from Diamond Creek Repeat Multibeam to
sead-int
on Feb 22, 2018 12:11:52 PM

Title: Flood Intermittency and Delta Islands

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0BZ645X

Creator(s) Max Daniller-Varghese (https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8008-8692) ,Wonsuck Kim (https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4709-971X) ,David Mohrig (https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1828-4526)

Abstract: This experiment is part of a larger ensemble exploring flood intermittency and delta island growth. They were conducted in the Surface Transport and Earth-surface Processes (STEP) Basin, located at the Morphodynamics Laboratory at the University of Texas at Austin. The experimental domain is 1.85 m x 2 m with a water depth of 50 mm over a 50-mm thick sediment bed. The bed is composed of the same grain size as the input sediment: fine quartz sand, with a D50 of 171 µm and a density of 2650 kg/m3. A computer controlled pump and auger feed the sediment and water (0.355 l/s at a concentration of 1:100) mixture into a bucket with an Arduino-controlled knife valve that connects to the domain inlet by a 2 inch PVC pipe. The water level in the STEP basin is maintained by a computer controlled weir, constraining water level within 1 mm of the 50 mm above the initial sediment bed height. The tank does not recirculate, and all the sediment from the flows remains in the domain during the experiments. The experiments were recorded with overhead time-lapse imagery, a photo taken every 15 seconds. The overhead images were preprocessed, correcting for lens distortions at the edge of the frames.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jan 16, 2018 1:11:23 PM

Title: Canopy Data and Applications Rescue Effort

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M04J0C60

Creator(s) Judy Cushing ,Michelle Wallace ,Noah Weiner ,Nalini Nadkarni ,Sharon McIntee ,Anne McIntosh ,James Myers ,Peter Lynn ,Anna Ovchinnikova

Abstract: These materials document a 'data rescue' effort undertaken as a collaboration between the leaders of the original research projects, students and staff at TESC, and the SEAD DataNet project. This effort involved gathering and organizing the existing materials, and a significant effort to annotate materials to enhance reusability. The effort's scope included preserving the projects' web documentation, image archive, software products (executable and source) including a database generation tool and visualization software, paper publications, and the field study data recorded using databases generated using the projects' database generator tool. In addition to preserving the original database files, the rescue effort converted all databases into a standard format (Software Independent Archiving of Relational Databases, http://www.eark-project.com/resources/specificationdocs/32-specification-for-siard-format-v20) and experimented with capturing a full virtual machine to provide a general mechanism to support live queries of the databases in the future. The included poster from the 2015 AGU conference describes the early parts of the effort. Our team wishes in particular to acknowledge the contributions of Michelle Wallace and Sharon McIntee, who had the primary responsibility for assembling materials, organizing them in SEAD, adding formal and informal (tag) annotations, and generating the SIARD and Virtual Machine forms of the databases.

Published: from CanopyDB Preservation to
sead-int
on Nov 14, 2017 10:38:01 AM

Title: CanopyDB Ecology Field Studies

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0862DKW

Creator(s) multiple - see metadata at the sub-collection level

Abstract: These studies were conducted using Ecological Informatics software developed, with support from the U.S. National Science Foundation, over more than a decade at The Evergreen State College (TESC) to address the needs of forest canopy researchers. Y. Bar-Ness: Tasmanian Eucalyptus obliqua: Crown Structure and Arthropod Biodiversity R. Dial: Borneo Insect Biomass and Count R. Dial: Open Space in Canopy Structure H. Ishii: Age-Related Development of Crown Structure B. Lyons: Epiphytes and Hemlocks E. Menendez Luquillo: Canopy Plot Visualization G. Parker: Three-Dimensional Canopy Structure T.Sanderson: Monteverde, Epiphyte Changes Over Time D. Shaw: Mistletoe and Hemlocks A. Sumida: Stick structure of Japanese chestnut B.VanPelt: Thousand Year Chronosequence

Published: from CanopyDB Preservation to
sead-int
on Nov 14, 2017 10:24:22 AM

Title: DNR Leave Tree Project

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0CZ358V

Creator(s) Van Pelt, R., and N. M. Nadkarni

Abstract: The goal of the Evergreen-DNR Leave Tree Project is to help forest managers use results from forest canopy research to help determine which trees to leave when harvesting a stand of trees. This project hopes to articulate how statements of policy that determine which trees to leave, e.g., "leave those trees that increase wildlife habitat", might be made more specific, and to refine definitions terms used when specifying leave tree requirements, such as: complex structure, broken tops, large branches, crown gap, continuous crown. The Leave Tree Project is currently gathering and analyzing data on how experts categorize crown shape and what they mean by certain commonly used terms such as "wildlife tree". We hope to develop an understanding of how crown structure relates to ecological values such as wildlife habitat. We are distributing a questionnaire and tree structure catalog to a panel to experts. The answers from the questionnaire will help us to determine commonalities that might be used to query our database for trees that satisfy certain structural features that, in turn, equate to particular ecological values.

Published: from CanopyDB Preservation to
sead-int
on Nov 14, 2017 10:18:28 AM

Title: CanopyDB Ecology Informatics Tools

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0HQ3X06

Creator(s) Cushing et. al. (see internal documentation for details)

Abstract: These applications were developed, with support from the U.S. National Science Foundation, over more than a decade at The Evergreen State College (TESC) to address the needs of forest canopy researchers. The tools include: Databank Database Generator: Graphical tool to generate ecological databases from standard and custom database templates. Generated database includes data entry forms, data dictionary, and Ecological Metadata Language (EML) documents. CanopyView: An interactive visualization tool designed to view tree structure, canopy coverage, and other data stored in Databank-generated databases. This publication also includes images that were stored in a web content management system operated as part of the project website. (Image annotations from that system have not been recovered).

Published: from CanopyDB Preservation to
sead-int
on Nov 14, 2017 10:11:38 AM

Title: CanopyDB Publications

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0NG4NQH

Creator(s) multiple - see file-level documentation

Abstract: These publications document the work by multiple research teams leveraging Ecological Informatics software developed over more than a decade at The Evergreen State College (TESC) to address the needs of forest canopy researchers.

Published: from CanopyDB Preservation to
sead-int
on Nov 14, 2017 9:59:24 AM

Title: Videos of lofting and ground-hugging turbidity currents

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0Z0368W

Creator(s) Elisabeth Steel ,James Buttles ,Alexander Simms ,David Mohrig ,Eckart Meiburg

Abstract: Videos from experiments performed in 2015 at the University of Texas at Austin. These lofting videos are of experimental turbidity currents with light interstitial fluid, achieved by heating interstitial fluid to 31 deg. C and keeping ambient tank water at 23 deg. C. Sediment concentration is varied between 1.5%, 2%, and 3% in these flows. Ground-hugging flows have the same density (i.e. temperature) interstitial and ambient water and have 1.6% sediment concentration. See the table included with this dataset and Steel et al., 2017 for all experimental conditions and results. These videos are meant to supplement results published in Steel, E., Buttles, J., Simms, A.R., Mohrig, D., and Meiburg, E., 2017, The role of buoyancy reversal in turbidite deposition and submarine fan geometry: Geology, 45(1), 35-38. doi: 10.1130/G38446.1

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Oct 2, 2017 4:32:54 PM

Title: TDB_12_1

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M03N21GX

Creator(s) Qi Li ,Kyle Straub ,Qi Li; Kyle Straub

Abstract: TDB-12-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.17 l/s), sediment (0.00017 l/s), and sea-level rise rate 0.25 (mm/hr). Experiment run time was 1285 hr. Experiment used a strongly cohesive sediment that had a wide grain size distribution with a median diameter of 65 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 1 hour of run time.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jul 26, 2017 8:44:39 PM

Title: TDB_13_1

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M07D2S7Q

Creator(s) Qi Li ,Kyle Straub ,Qi Li; Kyle Straub

Abstract: TDB-13-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.17 l/s), sediment (0.00017 l/s), and sea-level rise rate (0.25 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 1000 hr. Experiment was divided into 2 stages. The first stage used a weakly cohesive sediment while the second stage used a moderately cohesive sediment. Both sediment mixtures had wide grain size distributions with a median diameter of 65 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 1 hour of run time.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jul 26, 2017 7:13:38 PM

Title: TDB_14_2

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0RF5S4H

Creator(s) Qi Li ,Kyle Straub

Abstract: TDB-14-2: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.17 l/s), sediment (0.00017 l/s), and long term sea-level rise rate (0.25 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 1170 hr. Experiment used a strongly cohesive sediment that had a wide grain size distribution with a median diameter of 65 microns. Superimposed on the long term sea-level rise were sea-level cycles. The experiment was split into 2 stages. The first stage had sea-level cycles with periods of 24.5 hrs and amplitudes of 6.125 mm. The second stage had sea-level cycles with periods of 24.5 hrs and amplitudes of 3.06 mm. Experiment performed to explore interaction of autogenic sediment transport with sea-level cycles and resulting stratigraphy with topography monitored every 1 hour of run time.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jul 23, 2017 11:31:16 AM

Title: TDB_14_1

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0MP51D5

Creator(s) Qi Li ,Kyle Straub

Abstract: TDB-14-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.17 l/s), sediment (0.00017 l/s), and long term sea-level rise rate (0.25 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 630 hr. Experiment used a strongly cohesive sediment that had a wide grain size distribution with a median diameter of 65 microns. Superimposed on the long term sea-level rise were sea-level cycles with periods of 98 hrs and amplitudes of 24.5 mm. Experiment performed to explore interaction of autogenic sediment transport with sea-level cycles and resulting stratigraphy with topography monitored every 1 hour of run time.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jul 23, 2017 2:21:36 PM

Title: TDB_15_1

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M00V89W1

Creator(s) Liz Yu ,Kyle Straub

Abstract: TDB-15-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.17 l/s), sediment (0.00017 l/s), and long term sea-level rise rate (0.25 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 1170 hr. Experiment used a strongly cohesive sediment that had a wide grain size distribution with a median diameter of 65 microns. Superimposed on the long term sea-level rise were sea-level cycles. The experiment was split into 2 stages. The first stage had sea-level cycles with periods of 98 hrs and amplitudes of 3.06 mm. The second stage had sea-level cycles with periods of 24.5 hrs and amplitudes of 12.25 mm. Experiment performed to explore interaction of autogenic sediment transport with sea-level cycles and resulting stratigraphy with topography monitored every 1 hour of run time.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jul 22, 2017 7:06:36 PM

Title: TDB-11-1

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0D50K3T

Creator(s) Yinan Wang ,Kyle Straub

Abstract: TDB-11-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.902 l/s), sediment (0.011 l/s), and sea-level rise rate 5 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 77.2 hr. Experiment used non-cohesive sediment that was 70% by volume well sorted quartz sand with a median diameter of 110 microns and 30% by volume crushed coal with a median diameter of 400 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 2 minutes of run time.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Aug 19, 2017 9:55:06 AM

Title: TDB-10-2

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0W37TFH

Creator(s) Yinan Wang ,Kyle Straub

Abstract: TDB-10-2: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.902 l/s), sediment (0.022 l/s), and sea-level rise rate 10 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 39.3 hr. Experiment used non-cohesive sediment that was 70% by volume well sorted quartz sand with a median diameter of 110 microns and 30% by volume crushed coal with a median diameter of 400 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 2 minutes of run time.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jul 22, 2017 9:03:44 PM

Title: TDB-10-1

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0HX19TT

Creator(s) Yinan Wang ,Kyle Straub

Abstract: TDB-10-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.451 l/s), sediment (0.011 l/s), and sea-level rise rate 5 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 78.2 hr. Experiment used non-cohesive sediment that was 70% by volume well sorted quartz sand with a median diameter of 110 microns and 30% by volume crushed coal with a median diameter of 400 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 2 minutes of run time.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jul 21, 2017 10:51:26 AM

Title: 2014 Backward-Facing Step Flume Experiments

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0TB150B

Creator(s) Kate Leary

Abstract: This dataset includes data from flume experiments run in 2014 at Arizona State University investigating bedload transport and turbulent structures downstream of a 3.81 cm backward-facing step. Two high-speed cameras captured bedload motion and motion of neutrally buoyant particles in the flow at 9 different distance downstream of the backward-facing step. Bedload transport data were collected using manual particle tracking techniques on the bedload images. Neutrally buoyant particle images were run through Particle Image Velocimetry algorithms to generate a two-dimensional field of fluid velocity vectors. Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry data were also recorded to refine fluid velocity measurements. Data included herein: (1) Raw bedload images (Sed_raw.zip & sed130.zip) (2) Raw PIV images (PIV_all.zip) (3) Bedload transport .csv files (Bedload_Flux_AllRuns.xlsx) (4) Bedload time series (both downstream [DS] and cross-stream [CS]) .csv files (5) Bedload Tracking Videos (6) ADV files (ADV.zip) (7) Bedload Tracking .csv files (Sediment_Tracking.zip) This research is in collaboration with Dr. Mark Schmeeckle and was supported by a National Science Foundation research grant (award number: 1226288; PI: Mark Schmeeckle). Questions regarding this dataset should be directed to Kate Leary (learykcp@gmail.com).

Published: from 2014 Backward-Facing Step Experiments to
sead-int
on Jul 7, 2017 11:46:37 AM

Title: Sand on Salt - dune subsidence into a mobile substrate (PDMS)

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M09K487M

Creator(s) Anastasia Piliouras ,Wonsuck Kim

Abstract: This collection contains time-lapse photographs from experiments conducted by A. Piliouras and W. Kim, the results of which are published in Piliouras et al., (2014) in Lithosphere: http://dx.doi.org/10.1130/L323.1. More detailed methodologies can be found in the manuscript. Seismic data from the Gulf of Mexico showed evidence of large lenticular sand bodies (linear dunes) partially subsided into the underlying Louann salt. The dunes were preserved after a marine transgression, and they had variable preserved topographies. We performed experiments to determine what controlled dune subsidence rates and the amount of subsidence, such that we might produce variable subsided dune topographies. The dune here is intended to be a cross section through a linear dune, so it is essentially a triangular pile of sand (silica) deposited relatively instantaneously on top of PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), which we use as a proxy for salt (see references within Piliouras et al., (2014)). Run 1 has a sand to salt thickness ratio of 1 (sand thickness = salt thickness = 14.5 cm), while Run 2 has a ratio of 0.5 (sand thickness = 7.5 cm, salt thickness = 14.5 cm). Here we supply the original time lapse images and corresponding movies, as well as images corrected for camera lens distortion. Run 1 time lapse photos were every 5 minutes, and Run 2 time lapse photos were every 3 minutes. The lens corrected photos have 1 pixel = 1 mm. Flume dimensions can be found in the manuscript listed above to resize and/or process the raw photos.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Mar 16, 2017 3:40:25 PM

Title: Experiments in high-intensity bedload transport

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0G73BP0

Creator(s) Ricardo Hernandez Moreira

Abstract: Herein we present data collected during experiments in high intensity bedload transport. (Refer to http://sedexp.net/experiment/experiments-high-intensity-bedload-transport for more information on the experimental setup). The data are separated as follows: 00-profiles: Water surface and bed elevation profiles. 01-sonar data: Instantaneous realizations of bed elevation fluctuations captured by JSR ultrasonic probes. 02-media: collection of pictures, time-lapses and movies corresponding to the experiments. Data are divided by flow rate (i.e., 20 l/s, 30 l/s), by feed rate (e.g., 1.5 kg/min, 16 kg/min) and by experiment type (i.e. equilibrium or aggradational runs.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Feb 15, 2017 3:30:31 PM

Title: Massive units emplaced by bedload transport in sheet flow mode

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0M043C8

Creator(s) Ricardo Hernandez Moreira

Abstract: Herein we present data collected during experiments on massive deposition in upper regime. (Refer to http://sedexp.net/experiment/experiments-massive-deposits-upper-regime for more information on the experimental setup). The data are separated as follows: 00-profiles: Water surface and bed elevation profiles. 01-sonar data: Instantaneous realizations of bed elevation fluctuations captured by JSR ultrasonic probes. 02-media: collection of pictures, time-lapses and movies corresponding to the experiments. Data are divided by flow rate (i.e., 20 l/s, 30 l/s), by feed rate (e.g., 1.5 kg/min, 8, kg/min, 16 kg/min) and by experiment type (i.e. equilibrium or aggradational runs), wherever appropriate.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Feb 15, 2017 10:52:19 AM

Title: Wave Ripple Time-Lapse Experiments

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0QR4V39

Creator(s) J. Taylor Perron ,Myrow, Paul M. ,Huppert, Kimberly L. ,Koss, Abigail R. ,Andy Wickert

Abstract: Time-lapse animations, timeseries data, and summary data for laboratory wave tank experiments investigating the patterns that form as rippled beds adjust to changes in wave conditions.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Dec 7, 2016 5:08:58 PM

Title: Morphodynamics of mixed bedrock-alluvial systems

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0VH5KTM

Creator(s) Sadegh Jafarinik

Abstract: The data presented here include water surface elevation, Grain size distribution of the bed surface and parent material, bed surface elevation and some videos showing the alluvial-bedrock transitions and Paralaminations. There is also a powerpoint file which explains all the data in details.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Sep 14, 2016 4:50:42 PM

Title: Fold erosion by an antecedent river

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0CF9N3H

Creator(s) Aaron Bufe ,Burbank, Douglas W. ,Paola, Chris

Abstract: This collection contains the photographs and the topographic scans of the experiments published in Bufe A., Paola C., Burbank D.W., 2016. Fluvial bevelling of topography controlled by lateral channel mobility and uplift rate. Nature Geoscience., 9(9), 706-710, doi:10.1038/ngeo2773. For each experiment photographs were taken at regular intervals with a 10.5-mm, f/2.8 fisheye lens mounted on a DSLR camera. Fisheye distortion was removed using the inbuilt lens correction in Photoshop CS6 and were tilted such that the average slope of the alluvial fan is horizontal. Photos taken while the water was not running or when the dye feed was interrupted were not used. Moreover, for Run 4 only photographs from the first 25 h of runtime were processed and uploaded to the repository. All raw unprocessed images can be obtained upon request. Topographic data of the basin were acquired using a custom built laser scanner that was programmed to cover the entire basin except for its upper ~5% (~25 cm), in six swaths. The scans are provided as .dat file and have 4672 by 3001 mm2 sized pixels. To open the datafile in MATLAB : id=fopen(‘filename’,'r') A=fread(id,[4672 3001],'float'); fclose(id); The Metadata for the experiments is summarized in an excel spreadsheet. For each run there are entries about the input parameters as well as the timing of uplift events and the timing of topographic scans. In addition, timelapse videos of each run are included. For each run, the frame rate is 24 frames per second. With 1 minute between each picture, there are 24 min of real time in one second of the video.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Sep 9, 2016 8:26:36 AM

Title: BPNM_Publication

Persistent ID: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/78152

Creator(s) Greenberg, Jonathan ,Zhu, Zhenduo ,Jacobson, Robert B. ,Berretta, D ,Rhoads, Bruce ,Allison Goodwell ,Parker, Gary ,Holmes, R. ,Dutta, Debsunder ,Garcia, M ,Praveen Kumar

Abstract: This collection includes data developed and used for the analysis of the Birds Point-New Madrid (BPNM) Floodway activation in 2011. The data collection includes 10 items, all of which present the processed and derived data. The processed differential LiDAR is the 2005 (pre-flood) LiDAR subtracted from the 2011 (post-flood) LiDAR and corrected for flight line errors. The original LiDAR data were obtained from US Army Corps of Engineers. There are 5 simulated maximum velocity data items from HydroSed2D at two locations (O’Bryan Ridge and Ten Mile Pond) and 2 simulation cases (vegetation and no vegetation). The maximum velocity data for the entire Floodway is for the vegetated case. The NASA AVIRIS dataset is classified into classes representing woody vegetation and bare soil. The soil dataset (K/T) is an erodibility index derived from USDA SSURGO data. Additional data for this study was provided by the USGS, and is available along with the report at the following site: http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/1798e/. This data includes ADCP (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) flow measurements from the inflows an outflows of the Floodway, and HOBO depth sensor measurements from various points within the Floodway. This data were used to validate the HydroSed2D simulations.

Published: from Lower Mississippi Flood Project to
ideals
on Aug 19, 2016 12:34:55 PM

Title: Landscape evolution experiments - hillslope process control on drainage density

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M09P2ZM3

Creator(s) Roering, Joshua ,Sweeney, Kristin ,Ellis, Christopher

Abstract: These data are the raw and processed digital elevation models for the sandbox experiments detailed in "Experimental evidence for hillslope control of landscape scale" by K.E. Sweeney, J.J. Roering, and C. Ellis, which was published in Science in July of 2015. Landscape evolution theory suggests that climate sets the scale of landscape dissection by modulating the competition between diffusive processes that sculpt convex hillslopes and advective processes that carve concave valleys. However, the link between the relative dominance of hillslope and valley transport processes and landscape scale is difficult to demonstrate in natural landscapes due to the episodic nature of erosion. Here we report results from laboratory experiments combining diffusive and advective processes in an eroding landscape. We demonstrate that rainsplash-driven disturbances in our experiments are a robust proxy for hillslope transport, such that increasing hillslope transport efficiency decreases drainage density. Our experimental results demonstrate how the coupling of climate-driven hillslope- and valley-forming processes, such as bioturbation and runoff, dictates the scale of eroding landscapes.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sda
on Aug 16, 2016 9:36:08 AM

Title: Streamlab 2006

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M02B8W0V

Creator(s) Willcock, Peter ,Marr, Jeff D.

Abstract: StreamLab06 was a multiphase research endeavor involving academic researchers, federal agencies and stream restoration practitioners. This ongoing project is being conducted in the Main Channel at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory in Minneapolis, MN. The StreamLab program brings together a spectrum of research expertise (stream ecology and biology, engineering, hydrology, hydraulics and geomorphology) to conduct focused studies on a laboratory controlled, field scale, indoor stream environment. The first phase of the StreamLab06 project was completed in late March, 2006, and was focused on testing several existing and one new technology for sampling bedload transport. Technologies were tested in separate sets of sand and gravel trials. For the former, the channel was pre-loaded with sediment consisting of nearly uniformly sized (approximately 0.8mm) sand. Transported sand was captured in the channel's weigh pans, weighed, and recirculated. The water discharge varied (from trial to trial) between 2.0 and 3.6 cubic feet per second. Three standard "manual" samplers were tested: a 3" Helley-Smith, a 3" BL84 and an Elwha Sampler. For each, samples were taken at a fixed lateral position in the flow, just upstream from the weigh pans. Samples were taken over times varying from 15 seconds to one minute to see what sample-time would be necessary to capture natural variability in the sediment transport. In addition to these samplers, two (1200 and 600 kHz) Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) were installed and tested. These units just touch the water surface, and have the potential to deliver non-destructive information on sediment transport. For this experiment, researchers concentrated on the zones just upstream and downstream of the unit. In the downstream zone, which was just upstream of the weigh pans, a velocimeter (16mHz Micro ADV) provided a velocity profile of the flow, which will be used to calculate bed stresses. Finally, a 100 frame-per-second digital video camera capable of resolving individual grains captured the flow as it passed through the downstream zone. For the second set of trials, the sand was cleared from the channel, replaced with gravel, and several runs with varying discharges (up to a maximum of 5.5 cubic meters per second) were conducted. The same bedload sampling technologies were in place for the gravel runs, and a Toutle River 2 sampler was added to the mix.

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 15, 2016 12:56:17 PM

Title: Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM)

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M09W0CGK

Creator(s) National Center for Earth Surface Dynamics

Abstract: This is the SRTM dataset. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) obtained elevation data on a near-global scale to generate the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of Earth. SRTM consisted of a specially modified radar system that flew onboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour during an 11-day mission in February of 2000. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). --- Obtained on 5/30/2007 from: 30m US: ftp://e0srp01u.ecs.nasa.gov/srtm/version1/United_States_1arcsec/1arcsec/ 90m World: ftp://e0srp01u.ecs.nasa.gov/srtm/version2

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 11, 2016 5:11:41 PM

Title: XES Basin

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0FN145V

Creator(s) Wonsuck Kim ,Paola, Christopher (https://www.linkedin.com/in/chris-paola-84883110) ,Martin, John ,Mullin, James ,Cantelli, Alessandro (https://www.linkedin.com/in/alessandro-cantelli-5bb53b5) ,Strong, Nikki

Abstract: The XES facility is a large experimental basin (13 m x 6.5 m), developed and built with funds from NSF and the University of Minnesota , that permits the formation of stratigraphy through the use of a flexible subsiding floor. The goal is to reproduce the real-world (i.e. spatially variable) kinematics of subsidence, as determined by geophysical modeling and backstripping of real basins. The floor is a honeycomb of 432 independent subsidence cells (Fig. 1) through which a gravel ""basement"" is slowly removed to provide accommodation space for deposition. At the beginning of an experiment, the basin is filled with dry, well sorted commercial gravel. The top of the gravel is covered with a thin rubber membrane. The experimental deposit is formed on top of this membrane. Subsidence is induced by withdrawing gravel from the bottoms of the hexagonal cells. Each hexagon forms the top of a cone that tapers into a standard elbow pipe (Fig. 2). The gravel in the cone rests at the angle of repose in this elbow. Subsidence is induced by firing a pulse of high-pressure water into the gravel in the elbow. A small volume of gravel is knocked out of the elbow and falls into an exhaust line, where it is transported out of the system and stored for later reuse. Each subsidence cell has its own sealed pressure tube that drives the pulses via a computer-controlled solenoid valve. We have refined and calibrated the pulsing so that each pulse produces about 0.12 mm of subsidence: the ""earthquake slip"" in the experiments. This is about equal to the resolution with which the basement elevation can be read (described below), and also to the typical grain size of sediment in the experiments. Hence the subsidence is effectively smooth and continuous in time. The subsidence is also spatially continuous. The cells are separated only at floor level, so the gravel can flow laterally to accommodate differential subsidence with no breaks at the cell boundaries. Firing a single cell, for instance, produces a smooth bowl-shaped subsidence pattern that extends over the six adjoining cells. Extensive testing has shown that the underlying honeycomb structure is not imprinted on the subsidence at the surface until the rubber membrane (the top of the basement) has been lowered to within about 0.2 m of the honeycomb. This leaves about 1.3 m of usable accommodation space in the basin. As long as the gravel basement is loaded, lateral slopes of up to 60 can be produced between adjoining cells Premixed sediment and water can be fed from anywhere along the perimeter of the basin, and the level of standing water is independently set by a computer-controlled head tank mounted outside of the basin. Thus, base level (in effect, eustatic sea level) can be raised or lowered independent of events within the basin. During an experiment, the surface flow pattern is recorded using video and still cameras. In addition a topographic scanning system, based on the design of Rice and Wilson (1988) and Wilson (1990), allows us to document separately the 3-D evolution of the surface topography during the run for later comparison with the surface-flow images, the preserved deposits, and theoretical predictions. Once the experiment is complete, the tank is pumped dry and the resultant deposits are cut in a series of precise parallel faces, beginning near one edge. Each face is then photographed. At greater intervals, a peel is taken of the cut face. This serial microtome process allows us to build a 3-D image of the deposits by stacking the sequence of photographed slices.

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 16, 2016 7:28:16 AM

Title: Riparian Vegetation and Braided Stream Dynamics

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M05M63MB

Creator(s) Tilman, Elizabeth ,Paola, Christopher (https://www.linkedin.com/in/chris-paola-84883110) ,Tal, Michal ,Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi (https://www.linkedin.com/in/efi-foufoula-3b784410)

Abstract: Goal: 1. To study and quantify the interactions between riparian vegetation, channel morphology, and flow dynamics. 2. To investigate how river systems self-organize as a result of these interactions. 3. To investigate spatial and dynamic scaling in braided rivers with and without vegetation. Reseachers: Michal Tal, Chris Paola, Elizabeth Tilman (Water Resources, Univ. of MN), Efi Foufoula-Georgiou (Civil Engineering, Univ. of MN) Result: Ongoing experiments at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory are designed to isolate the effects of vegetation on braided stream dynamics. These experiments show how a fully braided stream with a noncohesive bed transitions to a single-thread (meandering) system when continuously forced with vegetation. Time-lapse photography and measurements of bed topography, flow depth, sediment output, and flow velocities enable us to study and quantify the morphodynamics of the system associated with this change.

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 16, 2016 10:39:23 AM

Title: Delta Basin

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0Q23X66

Creator(s) Martin, John ,Paola, Christopher (https://www.linkedin.com/in/chris-paola-84883110)

Abstract: The Delta Basin is a square flume measuring approximately 5 meters by 5 meters, and is 0.61 meters deep. The exact experimental configuration may vary depending on the scientific objectives - the specific scheme at right represents that for the DB03-1 and DB03-2 experiments. A mix of sediment and water are introduced at a single infeed point in one corner of the basin. This produces a radially symmetrical delta-like deposit. A syphon-based ocean controller at the opposite corner allows for precise base-level manipulation, and specifically for the creation of accommodation space via a slow base-level rise. Data Topography on the fluvial surface is measured using a laser-line system: laser lines (three are shown in the schematic) are projected onto the fluvial surface, and photographs taken at regular intervals by a camera on a fixed mount. Surface processes are recording using the same camera in time-lapse mode. Stratigraphy is recorded by slicing the resulting deposit and photographing the faces (with the same camera). "Peels" are also taken of the faces. By using the same camera in the same position, image data from all three data sets may be directly compared. --- DB03-1 Corrected surface images Images of the fluvial surface taken during the DB03-1 High Frequency Topography. See project description for details. The original images were taken every 15 seconds of run time and stored in Nikon's NEF format. These images have been corrected (for lens distortion and perspective) using Andromeda Software's Lendsoc Photoshop filter, and saved in JPG format. Images are stored in folders by calendar date. The file names are of the format "Ryyyy-mm-dd-hhmmss.jpg" where "R" stands for "run" (vs "T" in other experiment images for "topography") - note that the date/time is calendar not runtime - images with the runtime in the file name are elsewhere in the archive. DB03-1 Deposit Face Images Images of the DB03-1 Deposit stratigraphy. The deposit was sliced at the 1.5, 1.75, and 2.0 meter downstream transects, corresponding to the locations where surface topography measurements were taken. Another set of images is of a stream-wise face approximately at the center of the delta. Images are in Nikon's proprietary NEF format, and are uncorrected. DB03-1 Elevation Data These Excel workbooks contain fluvial surface elevation data from the DB03-1 experiment. See the readme. In the "cleaned_and_renamed" folder, the data have been cleaned up (redundant data removed, out-of-range data removed, worksheet names corrected, etc) but otherwise are unaltered. The "runtimetablefinal.xls" workbook has a table for converting the topo image file names (built from calendar time) into experiment run time. Data records pixels-above-bottom-of-image. Bottom-of-image is common to the topo images, surface images and deposit face images for correlation purposed. The data was created by analyzing the topo images (see project description) and establishing a weighted average elevation of the topo line at each point. Read the readme document for more information. DB03-1 Topography Data with event data This folder contains cleaned up elevation data from the DB03-1 experiment, plus aggradation and erosion event data. The main folder contains the elevation and event data workbooks: one Excel workbook per run day, and three sheets per workbook corresponding to the three topo lines, plus worksheets of event counts and durations. All elevation data is in pixels-above-bottom-of-image. The data was collected by analyzing images of laser lines (see project description) - note that the laser-line images were all corrected based on the calibration grid for the middle (x=1.75 meters) line, which may introduce minor errors in the data for the other two lines. In addition to the basic elevation data, the workbooks contain Event data (Aggradation and Erosion) for each day, plus the Excel macros that created the event data There are two workbooks with combined results - see the readme file. DB03-2 Final Deposit Images These images are composite images of the deposit. For each cross-stream transect, a series of overlapping images were taken, and these were stitched together to create these composites. The original images are elsewhere in this archive.

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 17, 2016 8:41:34 AM

Title: Stream Lab 2008

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0639MQ5

Creator(s) Singh, Arvind (https://www.linkedin.com/in/arvind-singh-38962114) ,Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi (https://www.linkedin.com/in/efi-foufoula-3b784410)

Abstract: StreamLab08 experiments were specifically designed to understand and quantify the effect of migrating gravel-bed topography on velocity fluctuations and sediment transport. These experiments provide a much higher resolution and longer duration flow field, bed topography and sediment transport measurements in the case of gravel-bed conditions compared to those of StreamLab06.

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 11, 2016 1:35:51 PM

Title: Angelo 1m DEMs - Derived Data Sets

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0SF2T43

Creator(s) Bode, Collin (collin@berkeley.edu) ,Belugi, Dino

Abstract: Digital Elevation Models (DEM) of Angelo Coast Range Reserve and South Fork Eel Watershed in Mendocino County, CA. This DVD contains a zip file with derived DEMs and coverages. They were processed from the original angelo 1meter DEM. Warning: it is 8.2GB when uncompressed. They all are 1x1 meter grid resolution, using UTM, zone 10, NAD83 projection. NCALM, University of Florida flew the LIDAR and processed it to 9column ascii files. They also created the bare-earth DEM. NCALM, UC Berkeley processed the DEMs and is responsible for distribution. The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) processed the source DEM as follows: 1. merged the tiles into one grid. 2. reprojected from geographic to UTM, zone 10, nad83 projection using bilinear interpolation. 3. Ran a series of analyses on the dataset to produce the folling DEMS GRIDS: - eel1mdemab: A over B: Area over gridcell size. - eel1mdemacc: Flow accumulation. Grid shows how many other grids flow into each square. Used for watershed delineation and for channel creation. - eel1mdemdir: Azimuth. Shows direction from north a grid cell is facing. Only 8 directions used, moving clockwise. - eel1mdemfil: Sinkfill. To get the flow accumulation, you must fill holes and pockets in the elevation model. This grid is essential a step in the processing. - eel1mdemrad: Slope of the gridcell. Coverages: - eelchannel: Result of Bill Dietrich's & Dino Belugi's work on channel formation. This is derived from the grids listed above. - eelcontour05: 5 meter topographic contours of the bare-earth DEM. - eelcontour10: 10 meter topographic contours of the bare-earth DEM. Any questions should be directed to NCALM. http://calm.geo.berkeley.edu/ncalm Dino Belugi can answer processing questions. dino@eps.berkeley.edu Collin Bode can answer general questions about the dataset. collin@berkeley.edu

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 9, 2016 12:47:53 PM

Title: Geology and Geomorphic Features Related to Landsliding

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0X63JVD

Creator(s) National Center for Earth Surface Dynamics

Abstract: This is a series of maps produced by the California Division of Mines and Geology (now known as the California Geological Survey). This contains most of the 7.5' USGS Quads in and around Angelo. The quad names are all from either Mendocino or Humboldt County. The series was published from 1983-84. The file numbers refer to the CALIFORNIA DMG OPEN-FILE REPORT.

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 9, 2016 12:02:28 PM

Title: 3D Maps

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0NP22DR

Creator(s) Morin, Paul ,Campbell, Karen (https://www.linkedin.com/in/karen-campbell-1336965)

Abstract: NCED is currently involved in researching the effectiveness of anaglyph maps in the classroom and are working with educators and scientists to interpret various Earth-surface processes. Based on the findings of the research, various activities and interpretive information will be developed and available for educators to use in their classrooms. Keep checking back with this website because activities and maps are always being updated. We believe that anaglyph maps are an important tool in helping students see the world and are working to further develop materials and activities to support educators in their use of the maps. This website has various 3-D maps and supporting materials that are available for download. Maps can be printed, viewed on computer monitors, or projected on to screens for larger audiences. Keep an eye on our website for more maps, activities and new information. Let us know how you use anaglyph maps in your classroom. Email any ideas or activities you have to ncedmaps@umn.edu Anaglyph paper maps are a cost effective offshoot of the GeoWall Project. Geowall is a high end visualization tool developed for use in the University of Minnesota's Geology and Geophysics Department. Because of its effectiveness it has been expanded to 300 institutions across the United States. GeoWall projects 3-D images and allows students to see 3-D representations but is limited because of the technology. Paper maps are a cost effective solution that allows anaglyph technology to be used in classroom and field-based applications. Maps are best when viewed with RED/CYAN anaglyph glasses! A note on downloading: "viewable" maps are .jpg files; "high-quality downloads" are .tif files. While it is possible to view the latter in a web-browser in most cases, the download may be slow. As an alternative, try right-clicking on the link to the high-quality download and choosing "save" from the pop-up menu that results. Save the file to your own machine, then try opening the saved copy. This may be faster than clicking directly on the link to open it in the browser. World Map: 3-D map that highlights oceanic bathymetry and plate boundaries. Continental United States: 3-D grayscale map of the Lower 48. Western United States: 3-D grayscale map of the Western United States with state boundaries. Regional Map: 3-D greyscale map stretching from Hudson Bay to the Central Great Plains. This map includes the Western Great Lakes and the Canadian Shield. Minnesota Map: 3-D greyscale map of Minnesota with county and state boundaries. Twin Cities: 3-D map extending beyond Minneapolis and St. Paul. Twin Cities Confluence Map: 3-D map highlighting the confluence of the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers. This map includes most of Minneapolis and St. Paul. Minneapolis, MN: 3-D topographical map of South Minneapolis. Bassets Creek, Minneapolis: 3-D topographical map of the Bassets Creek watershed. North Minneapolis: 3-D topographical map highlighting North Minneapolis and the Mississippi River. St. Paul, MN: 3-D topographical map of St. Paul. Western Suburbs, Twin Cities: 3-D topographical map of St. Louis Park, Hopkins and Minnetonka area. Minnesota River Valley Suburbs, Twin Cities: 3-D topographical map of Bloomington, Eden Prairie and Edina area. Southern Suburbs, Twin Cities: 3-D topographical map of Burnsville, Lakeville and Prior Lake area. Southeast Suburbs, Twin Cities: 3-D topographical map of South St. Paul, Mendota Heights, Apple Valley and Eagan area. Northeast Suburbs, Twin Cities: 3-D topographical map of White Bear Lake, Maplewood and Roseville area. Northwest Suburbs, Mississippi River, Twin Cities: 3-D topographical map of North Minneapolis, Brooklyn Center and Maple Grove area. Blaine, MN: 3-D map of Blaine and the Mississippi River. White Bear Lake, MN: 3-D topographical map of White Bear Lake and the surrounding area. Maple Grove, MN: 3-D topographical map of the NW suburbs of the Twin Cities. Minnesota River: 3-D topographical map of the Minnesota River Valley highlighting the river bend in Mankato. St. Croix River: 3-D topographical map of the St. Croix extending from Taylors Falls to the Mississippi confluence. Mississippi River, Lake Pepin: 3-D topographical map of the confluence of Chippewa Creek and the Mississippi River. Red Wing, MN: 3-D topographical map of Redwing, MN on the Mississippi River. Winona, Minnesota: 3-D topographical map of Winona, MN highlighting the Mississippi River. Cannon Falls, MN: 3-D topographical map of Cannon Falls area. Rochester, MN: 3-D topographical map of Rochester and the surrounding area. Northfield, MN: 3-D topographical map of Northfield and the surrounding area. St. Louis River, MN: 3-D map of the St. Louis River and Duluth, Minnesota. Lake Itasca, MN: 3-D map of the source of the Mississippi River. Elmore, MN: 3-D topographical map of Elmore, MN in south-central Minnesota. Glencoe, MN: 3-D topographical map of Glencoe, MN. New Prague, MN: 3-D topographical map of the New Prague in south-central Minnesota. Plainview, MN: 3-D topographical map of Plainview, MN. Waterville-Morristown: 3-D map of the Waterville-Morris area in south-central Minnesota. Eau Claire, WI: 3-D map of Eau Claire highlighting abandon river channels. Dubuque, IA: 3-D topographical map of Dubuque and the Mississippi River. Londonderry, NH: 3-D topographical map of Londonderry, NH. Santa Cruz, CA: 3-D topographical map of Santa Cruz, California. Crater Lake, OR: 3-D topographical map of Crater Lake, Oregon. Mt. Rainier, WA: 3-D topographical map of Mt. Rainier in Washington. Grand Canyon, AZ: 3-D topographical map of the Grand Canyon. District of Columbia: 3-D map highlighting the confluence of the rivers and the Mall. Ireland: 3-D grayscale map of Ireland. New Jersey: 3-D grayscale map of New Jersey. SP Crater, AZ: 3-D map of random craters in the San Francisco Mountains. Mars Water Features: 3-D grayscale map showing surface water features from Mars.

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 9, 2016 11:45:42 AM

Title: Stream Restoration Toolbox

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M00Z716D

Creator(s) Lauer, J. Wesley ,Cantelli, Alessandro (https://www.linkedin.com/in/alessandro-cantelli-5bb53b5) ,McElroy, Brandon ,Parker, Gary (https://www.linkedin.com/in/gary-parker-b5144ba2) ,Marr, Jeff D.

Abstract: The Stream Restoration Toolbox consists of current basic research cast into the form of tools that can be used by practitioners. The toolbox contains models, code, websites, and small applications that are useful for applied stream restoration Tools are free to download and use. The Toolbox is not limited to NCED but is open to all contributors. Tools are listed in alphabetical order. Tool title: Bank Stabilization Diagnosis Tool purpose: Determination as to whether or not bank stabilization should be a part of a river restoration scheme Primary tool author: J. Wesley Lauer File(s): BankStabilizationDiagnosisTool(ppt) Tool title: The Dam Remover: Mark I Tool purpose: Models the morphodynamics of the channel that incises reservoir sediments following dam removal. Primary tool author: Alessandro Cantelli File(s): DamRemoverMARK1(ppt) DamRemoverMARK1_front_view(mpg) DamRemoverMARK1_plan_view(mpg) Tool title: The Gravel River Bankfull Channel Estimator Tool purpose: This tool consists of a set of regression relations for predicting bankfull geometry of mobile-bed single-thread gravel bed streams in terms of bankfull discharge and bed surface median grain size. Primary tool author: Gary Parker File(s): BankfullChannelEstimator_v2(ppt) & GravelBankfullData(xls) Tool title: The Gravel River Bankfull Discharge Estimator Tool purpose: This tool consists of an equation to estimate bankfull discharge in an undisturbed (reference) reach of a single-thread, mobile-bed gravel-bed stream from measured channel characteristics. Primary tool author: Gary Parker File(s): BankfullDischargeEstimator_v2(ppt) & GravelBankfullData(xls) Tool title: Planform Statistics Tool purpose: Tools to assist in calculating planform statistics (width, curvature, channel migration rate). Primary tool author: J. Wesley Lauer File(s): PlanformStatisticsTools(ppt) Planform_statistics_tools_v91(mxd) Note - download to same directory Planform_statistics_tools_v91_2 Tool title: Sand Bed Calculator Tool purpose: Calculator to estimate bed geometry and bedload transport from sand bed surveys. Primary tool author: Brandon McElroy File(s): SandBedCalc(ppt) SandBedCalc(xls) Ebook: 1D Sediment Transport Morphodynamics with applications to: Rivers and Turbidity Currents Tool Purpose: This ebook is an amazing resource containing fundamental and applied lectures on rivers and turbidity currents as well as many other geomorphic processes. The main lectures are in PowerPoint. These lectures are linked to Excel files, most of which serve as graphical user interfaces for code in Visual Basic for Applications. Extended explanation is given in Word. Phenomena are illustrated with mpeg video clips. Author: Dr. Gary Parker, University of Illinois, Urbana Status: In development. Tool title: Spawning Habitat Integrated Rehabilitation Approach (SHIRA) Tool purpose: This website provides a comprehensive introduction to the issues and concepts surrounding spawning habitat rehabilitation on regulated rivers. The website includes description of the SHIRA framework, case studies, and reference list. Primary tool author: Professer Greg Pasternack, University of California-Davis Tool title: The Spawning Gravel Refresher Tool purpose: Allows design of controlled flood releases from dams combined with gravel feeding to restore over-coarsened and immobile former gravel spawning grounds. Primary tool author: Gary Parker Status: In development. Tool title: The Threshold Channel Calculator Tool purpose: Design of a threshold channel in an e.g., urban setting, for which the sediment supply has been cut off. Primary tool author: Peter Wilcock Status: In development.

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 9, 2016 11:42:10 AM

Title: Angelo 1m DEMS

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M01V5BX2

Creator(s) Belugi, Dino ,Bode, Collin (collin@berkeley.edu)

Abstract: Digital Elevation Models (DEM) of Angelo Coast Range Reserve and South Fork Eel Watershed in Mendocino County, CA. This Folder contains a zip file with 3 DEMs. Warning: it is 6.4GB when uncompressed. They all are 1x1 meter grid resolution, using UTM, zone 10, NAD83 projection. These are ESRI grids. 1. Bare-earth DEM: eel1mdem 2. Canopy DEM: eel1mcanopy 3. Vegetation Heights, i.e. the difference between the bare earth and canopy: eel1mdiff Data was flown for the purposes of improving algorithms for LIDAR bare-earth processing and to be the basis of interdisciplinary geology, ecology, hydrology modelling as performed by the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics. NCALM, University of Florida flew the LIDAR and processed it to 9column ascii files. They also created the bare-earth DEM. NCALM, UC Berkeley processed the canopy and veg heights DEMs and is responsible for distribution. Any questions can be directed to NCALM, UC Berkeley. http://calm.geo.berkeley.edu/ncalm

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 9, 2016 12:21:44 PM

Title: Eel River 10m DEM

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M08C9T69

Creator(s) Bode, Collin (collin@berkeley.edu)

Abstract: Eel Watershed digital elevation models (DEM). This DVD contains DEMs of the entire Eel River watershed. The Eel River is located mostly in Mendocino County on the coast of California. The source data for these DEMs comes from NED, USGS. Source data was 10x10 meter resolution in ESRI ArcInfo grid format and in geographic (lat/long) projection with NAD83 datum. It was downloaded from: http://seamless.usgs.gov/ The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) processed the source grids as follows: 1. merged the tiles into one grid. 2. reprojected from geographic to UTM, zone 10, nad83 projection using bilinear interpolation. 3. Ran a series of analyses on the dataset to produce the following DEMS eel10mdem: Basic grid of elevation, 10m resolution eel10mdemacc: Flow accumulation. Grid shows how many other grids flow into each square. Used for watershed delineation and for channel creation. eel10mdemdir: Azimuth. Shows direction from north a grid cell is facing. Only 8 directions used, moving clockwise. eel10mdemfil: Sinkfill.To get the flow accumulation, you must fill holes and pockets in the elevation model. This grid is essential a step in the processing. eel10mdemshd: Hillshade. Models realistic afternoon sun hitting the elevation model. Excellent for visualization. Any questions should be directed to NCALM. http://calm.geo.berkeley.edu/ncalm Dino Belugi can answer processing questions. dino@eps.berkeley.edu Collin Bode can answer general questions about the dataset. collin@berkeley.edu

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 9, 2016 11:51:48 AM

Title: IFRI database and derivatives archive

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M01834G4

Creator(s) The International Forestry Resources and Institutions (IFRI)

Abstract: This dataset is the result of several ongoing efforts of the socio-ecological informatics group at Indiana University (http://d2i.indiana.edu/socio-eco-informatics). It contains a 2011 snapshot of the database of the International Forestry Resources and Institutions (IFRI) research network, a research program initiated by Elinor Ostrom in 1992 at Indiana University and several transformations that can help others to work with the database and further enhance the data.

Published: from International Forestry Resources and Institutions to
sda
on Aug 8, 2016 5:18:15 PM

Title: VIC Output for Carolinas, 1998-2007

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0DF6P6F

Creator(s) Mirza Billah

Abstract: Output from a VIC model for the Carolinas, USA calibrated for the period 1998-2007 to study drought impacts.

Published: from Hydroshare to
sda
on Aug 8, 2016 5:01:53 PM

Title: TerraPopData Extract

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M08P5XH5

Creator(s) Bakinam Essawy

Abstract: Population data extracted from TerraPop (https://data.terrapop.org) for the study region.

Published: from Hydroshare to
sda
on Aug 8, 2016 5:01:44 PM

Title: WSO_OutputViz

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0513W51

Creator(s) Bakinam Essawy

Abstract: Impact of 2007 drought on five counties in the study region.

Published: from Hydroshare to
sda
on Aug 8, 2016 4:59:15 PM

Title: WSO

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0J67DXR

Creator(s) Bakinam Essawy

Abstract: The scripts and related files used to create the iRODS Workflow Structured Object (WSO).

Published: from Hydroshare to
sda
on Aug 8, 2016 4:57:07 PM

Title: Synthetic Bedrock Strength Measurements for Debris Flow Erosion Experiments

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0SQ8XDZ

Creator(s) Leslie Hsu

Abstract: Tensile strength measurements for synthetic bedrock (weak concrete) samples in debris flow erosion experiments at UC Berkeley (Hsu, Dietrich, and Sklar). Additional data includes cement type (I or III), ratio of cement to silica, and dates of pouring and testing.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sda
on Aug 8, 2016 2:36:57 PM

Title: Illgraben bedrock erosion samples

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0XG9P4P

Creator(s) Badoux, Alexandre ,Sklar, L. S. ,Leslie Hsu ,Dietrich, William E. ,McArdell, B. W.

Abstract: Erosion marks on marble and granite bed samples in the Illgraben Torrent (2006-2007). When studying bedrock erosion by a debris flows event, rarely do we know the detailed initial topography of the bedrock channel. This makes it impossible to measure the volume loss due to single debris flow events. To overcome this challenge, we placed initially flat stone samples of marble and granite in the Illgraben torrent, Switzerland, a location frequently scoured by natural debris flows. At the Illgraben, there are typically several events per year, due to the high availability of source material in the upper catchment that fail during summer rain storms (e.g. McArdell et al., 2007; Badoux et al., 2009, Berger, 2011). The stone samples captured groove and impact marks on the stone samples caused by the debris flows.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sda
on Aug 8, 2016 2:32:49 PM

Title: Church and Rood Alluvial River Channel Regime Data

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0TB14V4

Creator(s) Kenneth Rood ,Michael Church

Abstract: Data compiled from various sources on 284 streams and rivers: river morphology, river process, discharge, hydraulic geometry and grain size.

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 9, 2016 11:45:42 AM

Title: William Brownlie Alluvial Channel Data

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0028PFT

Creator(s) National Center for Earth Surface Dynamics

Abstract: In recent years, attempts have been made to develop numerical models for unsteady flows in channels with sediment transport. This work was conducted to analyze two essential ingredients of any numerical model: the relationship between the hydraulic variables (slope, depth, and velocity), and the predictor of sediment concentration. Report KH-R-43A (not in this archive) presents a detailed analysis of the two components and examines their role in numerical modeling. Six hydraulic relationships and 13 sediment concentration predictors are examined and compared. New relationships are then developed which appear to be more accurate than the existing techniques. Finally, the new relationships are utilized in a numerical unsteady flow, moveable bed model which uses a four-point implicit finite difference solution scheme. The data base associated with this report (presented originally as Report KH-R-43B) contains 7,027 records (5,263 laboratory records and 1,764 field records), in 77 data files. The data are provided here as two spreadsheets – field data and laboratory data. Not all records were used in the final analyses, but they have been included in an attempt to provide a historically complete set of alluvial channel observations. The material presented in these reports is essentially the same as the thesis submitted by the author in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. A common list of references, with data sources separated from other references, has been included in both reports. Abstract: A compilation of twentieth century observations of alluvial channels, both field and lab, in a standard format, from a wide variety of sources. Source: Compilation of Alluvial Channel Data: Laboratory and Field, by William R. Brownlie, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, November 1981 Data are arranged by stream, and include measuremens of discharge, width, length, depth, slope, temperature, and bedload measures including D50 grainsize, gradation, specific gravity, and concentration.

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 9, 2016 11:15:50 AM

Title: Eel River Flipchart

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M07S7KRN

Creator(s) Power, Mary E. ,Bode, Collin (collin@berkeley.edu)

Abstract: This is a 34 page flipchart of the Angelo Reserve. Each page is an 8.5x11 map of a river segment. The maps show the location of the highest accumulated streamflow (using DEM) as the river, even though the channel is wider, and use the vegetative canopy DEM colored by vegetation height. Note the decision to use canopy instead of the traditional bare-earth is to provide visual references while out in the field. Bare-earth provides little help when maps are zoomed in this close. Laminated versions will be availible at the ACCR Science Center to be used during field sampling. Sampling sites can be drawn directly on the maps with a sharpie then removed later using alcohol. Marked up maps are to be either copied using the xerox machine, or scanned. Scanned versions can be sent to Collin Bode to convert the points into a GIS coverage.

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 9, 2016 11:47:06 AM

Title: Eel River Steelhead Study

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0125QK6

Creator(s) Power, Mary E.

Abstract: Throughout the world, historically large populations of native anadromous salmonids are in severe decline or extinct. In the United States alone, twenty-six Evolutionarily Significant Units of Pacific salmonid are currently threatened or endangered. These declines are most commonly attributed to degradation of spawning and rearing habitat resulting from increased loading of fine sediments. Although excessive loading of fine sediments into rivers is well known to degrade salmonid spawning habitat, its effects on the demographically critical rearing juveniles have been unclear. We experimentally manipulated fine bed sediment in a northern California river and examined responses of a juvenile salmonid. Increasing concentrations of deposited fine sediment decreased growth and survival of juvenile steelhead trout. These declines resulted from a shift in invertebrates toward burrowing taxa unavailable as prey and from increased steelhead activity and injury at higher levels of fine sediment. The relationship between deposited fine sediment and juvenile steelhead growth is linear. This suggests that there is no threshold below which exacerbation of fine sediment delivery and storage in gravel bedded rivers will be harmless, but also that any reduction will produce immediate benefits for salmonid restoration.

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 9, 2016 11:47:46 AM

Title: Eel River Quads

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0H41PCM

Creator(s) National Center for Earth Surface Dynamics

Abstract: A listing of Quads available from the USGS covering some or all of the Eel River basin, and location maps in jpg and pdf formats.

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 9, 2016 11:48:49 AM

Title: Debris Flow Flume

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0KH0K9H

Creator(s) Leslie Hsu

Abstract: A 4-meter diameter, 80-cm wide rotating debris flow flume was constructed at the University of California Richmond Field Station for studying large-scale granular flow phenomena. This dataset covers the experiments conducted in 2007 and 2008, where the primary goal was to study rates and mechanisms of bedrock erosion by debris flows. The following data will be posted at the NCED Repository: (Please see the temporary folder for now: https://docs.google.com/folder/d/0B5JYwkWgsLhRSDl5aGRUd2lYVG8/edit ) 1. Master list of experiments 2. Force plate data 3. Laser profile data 4. Erosion topography data 5. Videos 6. MATLAB scripts Last updated 2012/07/15 *** 1. 01-debrisflow_mastertable.xls lists the experiment number, unique ID (YYMMDD), description, effective diameter, and bulk flow velocity. 2. to be deposited 3. to be deposited 4. to be deposited 5a. Debris Flow Flume videos 05a-debrisflow-drum-videos.zip: ,asf videos (can be played with the VLC player:http://www.videolan.org/vlc/) labeled as YYMMDD-MMSS_start-MMSS_end. 5b. Granular Flow and Debris Flow Video Examples 05b-debrisflow-drum-videos.zip: These are .wmv files of field and laboratory granular flows and debris flows. The purpose of these videos is to show the great range in behavior of granular and debris flow. Videos were taken at the Illgraben Torrent, (a debris flow channel in Switzerland), in the large rotating debris flow flume (Big Wheel) at the Richmond Field Station, University of California, Berkeley, and in the small rotating debris flow flume (Maytag) at the Richmond Field Station. 6. to be deposited For more information contact: hsu.leslie@gmail.com

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 9, 2016 11:57:14 AM

Title: Experimental Study of Delta Erosion Due to Dam Removal

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0W95739

Creator(s) Parker, Gary (https://www.linkedin.com/in/gary-parker-b5144ba2) ,Paola, Christopher (https://www.linkedin.com/in/chris-paola-84883110) ,Cantelli, Alessandro (https://www.linkedin.com/in/alessandro-cantelli-5bb53b5)

Abstract: Cantelli, A., Paola, C. and Parker, G., 2004, Experiments on upstream-migrating erosional narrowing and widening of an incisional channel caused by dam removal, Water Resources Research, 40, W03304, doi:10.1029/2003/WR002940 The present paper reports on a laboratory investigation of the erosion of a deltaic front induced by the removal of a dam. We built a laboratory model of a dam, and observed both the sedimentation in the reservoir due to the downstream propagation of a delta front and the erosion of the delta front during dam removal, including measurement of channel morphology and flow field. Based on an analysis of bank erosion two principal erosive trends were detected: during the initial stage of erosion the width of each section quickly decreased to a minimum value, after which the section widened. Undistorted Froude similitude is used to scale the results up to field dimensions.

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 9, 2016 11:49:58 AM

Title: Angelo Basic GIS Coverages

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0X9287P

Creator(s) Power, Mary E. ,Bode, Collin (collin@berkeley.edu) ,Dietrich, William E.

Abstract: Projection: UTM, zone 10, datum NAD83. GIS file format: ESRI Shapefile for vector, ESRI arcinfo binary GRID format for raster. Data Sources: National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM, http://ncalm.berkeley.edu): Lidar DEM of the South Fork Eel watershed at Angelo reserve was created by NCALM. This data is new and still is being post processed. The dem is extremely high quality (1m resolution). California Spatial Information Library (CASIL, http://gis.ca.gov): public and federal datasets, including USGS drg, doqq, and blue-line datasets. Naming Conventions: This is not strictly followed. Files start with their spatial scale and end with their projection. Maps will often end with their DPI resolution. Eel: entire eel watershed Sfk: South Fork Eel Nfk: North Fork Eel Angelo: Angelo Reserve

Published: from National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics to
sead-int
on Aug 9, 2016 11:50:48 AM

Title: Debris flow flume video (mp4)

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0416V23

Creator(s) Leslie Hsu ,Johnson, Joel, P. ,Dietrich, William E. ,Sklar, Leonard S.

Abstract: Debris-flow flume video clips. Granular flows in a 4-meter diameter, 0.8-meter wide vertically rotating flume to study basal force and erosion beneath debris-flows. The video files are named by [Run ##]_[MMSS_start]-[MMSS_end]_[velocity m/s]. This work was supported by the STC program of the National Science Foundation via the National Center for Earth-surface dynamics under the agreement EAR-0120914.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sda
on Aug 8, 2016 11:20:12 AM

Title: Debris Flow Flume - Bedrock Erosion Data

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0086399

Creator(s) Leslie Hsu ,Sklar, Leonard S. ,Dietrich, William E.

Abstract: Photos and topographic maps in .mat format of the erosion samples in the Debris Flow Flume. Work originally published in Hsu, Leslie, 2010, Bedrock Erosion by Debris Flows, Ph.D dissertation, University of California, Berkeley. This work was supported by the STC program of the National Science Foundation via the National Center for Earth-surface dynamics under the agreement EAR-0120914.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sda
on Aug 8, 2016 11:20:32 AM

Title: Photogrammetry Technique Manual for the Small and Big Basins

Persistent ID: http://dx.doi.org/10.5967/M0RR1W7P

Creator(s) Braudrick, Christian ,Leverich, Glen

Abstract: Description of the photogrammetry technique for measuring topography in the Small and Big Basins of the Richmond Field Station, University of California, Berkeley.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sda
on May 9, 2016 6:20:26 PM

Title: Density Current Confluence Velocity Data

Persistent ID: http://dx.doi.org/10.5967/M0WH2N0V

Creator(s) Imran,Jasim ,Ismail,Hassan ,Viparelli,Enrica

Abstract: Data collected and processed by H. Ismail et al during density current confluence experiments at the University of South Carolina Hydraulics Lab (2013-2015). In all files, x, y, and z denote down-stream, cross-channel, and vertical coordinates, respectively. The origin is the upstream junction point on the flume bed. u and v denote velocity in the x and y directions, respectively. U and H are depth-averaged velocity and current thickness, respectively. "vertical-profiles-u.xlsx" contains down-stream (u) velocity versus distance from the bed at 9 locations along the main channel centerline. "horizontal-u.xlsx" and "horizontal-v.xlsx" contain measurements of down-stream (u) and cross-channel (v) data at 3000 data points located on five horizontal planes in the vicinity of the junction in the main channel. "layer-averaged.xlsx" contains computed depth-averaged velocity and current thickness for each profile defined by the data in "vertical-profiles-u.xlsx".

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sda
on May 9, 2016 6:05:06 PM