Sediment Experimentalist Network

The Sediment Experimentalist Network (SEN) aims to to facilitate broad collaborations within the Earth-surface community to determine, address, and promote responses to our needs as scientists and educators for best practices in experimental methods and in the storage, archiving, and dissemination of experimental data.

The Project Space team has made the following datasets and collections publicly available. You must be a logged-in member of the Project Space to access all the datasets and collections.

Datasets

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Steady and transient sand bedform evolution at Clear Run, North Carolina, September 2009

The evolution of sand bedforms through time was observed through time-lapse overhead camera imagery at Clear Run, a small, sand-bedded stream in Wilmington, North Carolina, USA. These observations were made as part of a larger study of "hyporheic" (i.e., surface-subsurface) solute and fine particle exchange through the injection and tracking of tracer solutes and particles in the stream channel. In particular, two scenarios were considered for observing hyporheic exchange and associated bedform evolution: (1) steady background "base" flow conditions, and (2) time-varying "flood wave" conditions associated with the opening of an artificial dam upstream of the observation section on the stream. The overall study is described in Harvey et al. (2012, Journal of Geophysical Research 117, G00N11, doi:10.1029/2012JG002043).

This dataset contains processed images for the steady and transient bedform evolution observed at Clear Run on September 18, 2009. The images provided here were captured with a Nikon D5000 camera looking downward from approximately 2.5m above the stream bed. Time-lapse images were captured every 30 seconds. The images were rotated to align with the stream channel geometry and cropped to remove the stream banks and other non-bedform components of the image. Steady-flow images were further processed to normalize for variation in lighting. Specific details for each set of images are provided here:

(1) Steady base flow observations (individual .jpg images contained in folder "ClearRunSteady_CroppedRotatedNorm")
Images numbered 12 to 588 (577 total images, numbers increasing through time) were captured at 30-second intervals during steady base flow conditions on 18 September 2009, starting at 11:00:32 AM local time (Eastern Daylight Time). In all images, flow is from left to right. The vertical (spanwise) extent of the images is 2664 pixels (175.0 cm), and the horizontal (streamwise) extent is 1520 pixels (99.9 cm), based on a conversion factor of 0.0657 cm/pixel.

(2) Transient flood wave observations (individual .jpg images contained in folder "ClearRunFlood_CroppedRotated")
Images numbered 1 to 300 (300 total images, numbers increasing through time) were captured at 30-second intervals during the artificially-induced dam-release flood wave on 18 September 2009, starting at 4:08:32 PM local time (Eastern Daylight Time). In all images, flow is from left to right. The vertical (spanwise) extent of the images is 2904 pixels (201.8 cm), and the horizontal (streamwise) extent is 1612 pixels (112.0 cm), based on a conversion factor of 0.0695 cm/pixel.

An additional metadata file ("ClearRun_metadata.xlsx") provides timing information for each of the photos in the steady and transient flow collections.

Thumbnail of Transient Flows Unimodal sediment

Transient Flows Unimodal sediment

Sediment transport experiments with variable water discharge conducted at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota. These experiments explore the effects of flood hydrograph shape on bed-load transport dynamics. The dataset is composed of over 200 individual experimental runs with varying discharge and sediment feed rates for a unimodal sediment mixture with a median size of 7 mm. Raw data included in this data set for each experimental flood includes time series of varying water level and force on the load cell due to the accumulating sediment flux. These data are processed into time series of water depth, dimensional and dimensionless stress, sediment mass, and sediment flux for each run. Accompanying these data are topographic scans of the sediment bed of 1 mm vertical and spatial resolution.

Aeolian saltation fieldwork 30-minute wind and saltation values

Excel spreadsheet (.XLSX) containing 30-minute values for shear velocity, shear stress, wind direction, stability parameter, saltation layer height, total saltation flux, saltation detection frequency, and associated uncertainties for most of these values for field deployments at Jericoacoara (Brazil), Rancho Guadalupe (California), and Oceano (California).

Thumbnail of Experimental Meandering  Video

Experimental Meandering Video

This video is a series of overhead images taken of an experiment with constant discharge and sediment supply. Frames are 30 minutes apart, Flow is from left to right. The white material is a lightweight plastic, the brownish material is sand, and the green colors are alfalfa sprouts.

Thumbnail of TDB_14_1

TDB_14_1

TDB-14-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.17 l/s), sediment (0.00017 l/s), and long term sea-level rise rate (0.25 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 630 hr. Experiment used a strongly cohesive sediment that had a wide grain size distribution with a median diameter of 65 microns. Superimposed on the long term sea-level rise were sea-level cycles with periods of 98 hrs and amplitudes of 24.5 mm. Experiment performed to explore interaction of autogenic sediment transport with sea-level cycles and resulting stratigraphy with topography monitored every 1 hour of run time.

Thumbnail of TDB-10-2

TDB-10-2

TDB-10-2: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.902 l/s), sediment (0.022 l/s), and sea-level rise rate 10 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 39.3 hr. Experiment used non-cohesive sediment that was 70% by volume well sorted quartz sand with a median diameter of 110 microns and 30% by volume crushed coal with a median diameter of 400 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 2 minutes of run time.

Thumbnail of TDB_SIESD_2015

TDB_SIESD_2015

These materials have been migrated from SEAD 1.5. This abstract has been added since one did not exist in the original 1.5 collection. If not explicitly set, the owner of the original collection has been assumed as the creator for migration purposes.

Thumbnail of TDB-11-1

TDB-11-1

TDB-11-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.902 l/s), sediment (0.011 l/s), and sea-level rise rate 5 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 77.2 hr. Experiment used non-cohesive sediment that was 70% by volume well sorted quartz sand with a median diameter of 110 microns and 30% by volume crushed coal with a median diameter of 400 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 2 minutes of run time.

Thumbnail of Tulane Logo

Tulane Logo

These materials have been migrated from SEAD 1.5. This abstract has been added since one did not exist in the original 1.5 collection. If not explicitly set, the owner of the original collection has been assumed as the creator for migration purposes.

Collections

There are no public collections associated with this Project Space.

The following datasets have been published through this Project Space and any affiliated Project Spaces.

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Title: Steady and transient sand bedform evolution at Clear Run, North Carolina, September 2009

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0GM85FG

Creator(s) Raleigh L. Martin

Abstract: The evolution of sand bedforms through time was observed through time-lapse overhead camera imagery at Clear Run, a small, sand-bedded stream in Wilmington, North Carolina, USA. These observations were made as part of a larger study of "hyporheic" (i.e., surface-subsurface) solute and fine particle exchange through the injection and tracking of tracer solutes and particles in the stream channel. In particular, two scenarios were considered for observing hyporheic exchange and associated bedform evolution: (1) steady background "base" flow conditions, and (2) time-varying "flood wave" conditions associated with the opening of an artificial dam upstream of the observation section on the stream. The overall study is described in Harvey et al. (2012, Journal of Geophysical Research 117, G00N11, doi:10.1029/2012JG002043). This dataset contains processed images for the steady and transient bedform evolution observed at Clear Run on September 18, 2009. The images provided here were captured with a Nikon D5000 camera looking downward from approximately 2.5m above the stream bed. Time-lapse images were captured every 30 seconds. The images were rotated to align with the stream channel geometry and cropped to remove the stream banks and other non-bedform components of the image. Steady-flow images were further processed to normalize for variation in lighting. Specific details for each set of images are provided here: (1) Steady base flow observations (individual .jpg images contained in folder "ClearRunSteady_CroppedRotatedNorm") Images numbered 12 to 588 (577 total images, numbers increasing through time) were captured at 30-second intervals during steady base flow conditions on 18 September 2009, starting at 11:00:32 AM local time (Eastern Daylight Time). In all images, flow is from left to right. The vertical (spanwise) extent of the images is 2664 pixels (175.0 cm), and the horizontal (streamwise) extent is 1520 pixels (99.9 cm), based on a conversion factor of 0.0657 cm/pixel. (2) Transient flood wave observations (individual .jpg images contained in folder "ClearRunFlood_CroppedRotated") Images numbered 1 to 300 (300 total images, numbers increasing through time) were captured at 30-second intervals during the artificially-induced dam-release flood wave on 18 September 2009, starting at 4:08:32 PM local time (Eastern Daylight Time). In all images, flow is from left to right. The vertical (spanwise) extent of the images is 2904 pixels (201.8 cm), and the horizontal (streamwise) extent is 1612 pixels (112.0 cm), based on a conversion factor of 0.0695 cm/pixel. An additional metadata file ("ClearRun_metadata.xlsx") provides timing information for each of the photos in the steady and transient flow collections.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jul 31, 2018 4:30:44 PM

Title: Transient Flows Unimodal sediment

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0S180MK

Creator(s) Colin B. Phillips

Abstract: Sediment transport experiments with variable water discharge conducted at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota. These experiments explore the effects of flood hydrograph shape on bed-load transport dynamics. The dataset is composed of over 200 individual experimental runs with varying discharge and sediment feed rates for a unimodal sediment mixture with a median size of 7 mm. Raw data included in this data set for each experimental flood includes time series of varying water level and force on the load cell due to the accumulating sediment flux. These data are processed into time series of water depth, dimensional and dimensionless stress, sediment mass, and sediment flux for each run. Accompanying these data are topographic scans of the sediment bed of 1 mm vertical and spatial resolution.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jul 6, 2018 1:03:57 PM

Title: Transient Flows Unimodal sediment

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5072/FK2VX0F87M

Creator(s) Colin B. Phillips

Abstract: Sediment transport experiments with variable water discharge conducted at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota. These experiments explore the effects of flood hydrograph shape on bed-load transport dynamics. The dataset is composed of over 200 individual experimental runs with varying discharge and sediment feed rates for a unimodal sediment mixture with a median size of 7 mm. Raw data included in this data set for each experimental flood includes time series of varying water level and force on the load cell due to the accumulating sediment flux. These data are processed into time series of water depth, dimensional and dimensionless stress, sediment mass, and sediment flux for each run. Accompanying these data are topographic scans of the sediment bed of 1 mm vertical and spatial resolution.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jul 6, 2018 9:56:30 AM

Title: Flood Intermittency and Delta Islands

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0BZ645X

Creator(s) Max Daniller-Varghese (https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8008-8692) ,Wonsuck Kim (https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4709-971X) ,David Mohrig (https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1828-4526)

Abstract: This experiment is part of a larger ensemble exploring flood intermittency and delta island growth. They were conducted in the Surface Transport and Earth-surface Processes (STEP) Basin, located at the Morphodynamics Laboratory at the University of Texas at Austin. The experimental domain is 1.85 m x 2 m with a water depth of 50 mm over a 50-mm thick sediment bed. The bed is composed of the same grain size as the input sediment: fine quartz sand, with a D50 of 171 µm and a density of 2650 kg/m3. A computer controlled pump and auger feed the sediment and water (0.355 l/s at a concentration of 1:100) mixture into a bucket with an Arduino-controlled knife valve that connects to the domain inlet by a 2 inch PVC pipe. The water level in the STEP basin is maintained by a computer controlled weir, constraining water level within 1 mm of the 50 mm above the initial sediment bed height. The tank does not recirculate, and all the sediment from the flows remains in the domain during the experiments. The experiments were recorded with overhead time-lapse imagery, a photo taken every 15 seconds. The overhead images were preprocessed, correcting for lens distortions at the edge of the frames.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
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on Jan 16, 2018 1:11:23 PM

Title: Videos of lofting and ground-hugging turbidity currents

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0Z0368W

Creator(s) Elisabeth Steel ,James Buttles ,Alexander Simms ,David Mohrig ,Eckart Meiburg

Abstract: Videos from experiments performed in 2015 at the University of Texas at Austin. These lofting videos are of experimental turbidity currents with light interstitial fluid, achieved by heating interstitial fluid to 31 deg. C and keeping ambient tank water at 23 deg. C. Sediment concentration is varied between 1.5%, 2%, and 3% in these flows. Ground-hugging flows have the same density (i.e. temperature) interstitial and ambient water and have 1.6% sediment concentration. See the table included with this dataset and Steel et al., 2017 for all experimental conditions and results. These videos are meant to supplement results published in Steel, E., Buttles, J., Simms, A.R., Mohrig, D., and Meiburg, E., 2017, The role of buoyancy reversal in turbidite deposition and submarine fan geometry: Geology, 45(1), 35-38. doi: 10.1130/G38446.1

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
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on Oct 2, 2017 4:32:54 PM

Title: Videos of lofting and ground-hugging turbidity currents

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5072/FK23T9MK13

Creator(s) James Buttles ,Alexander Simms ,David Mohrig ,Eckart Meiburg

Abstract: Videos from experiments performed in 2015 at the University of Texas at Austin. These lofting videos are of experimental turbidity currents with light interstitial fluid, achieved by heating interstitial fluid to 31 deg. C and keeping ambient tank water at 23 deg. C. Sediment concentration is varied between 1.5%, 2%, and 3% in these flows. Ground-hugging flows have the same density (i.e. temperature) interstitial and ambient water and have 1.6% sediment concentration. See the table included with this dataset and Steel et al., 2017 for all experimental conditions and results. These videos are meant to supplement results published in Steel, E., Buttles, J., Simms, A.R., Mohrig, D., and Meiburg, E., 2017, The role of buoyancy reversal in turbidite deposition and submarine fan geometry: Geology, 45(1), 35-38. doi: 10.1130/G38446.1

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
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on Oct 2, 2017 11:58:55 AM

Title: TDB_12_1

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M03N21GX

Creator(s) Qi Li ,Kyle Straub ,Qi Li; Kyle Straub

Abstract: TDB-12-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.17 l/s), sediment (0.00017 l/s), and sea-level rise rate 0.25 (mm/hr). Experiment run time was 1285 hr. Experiment used a strongly cohesive sediment that had a wide grain size distribution with a median diameter of 65 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 1 hour of run time.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
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on Jul 26, 2017 8:44:39 PM

Title: TDB_13_1

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M07D2S7Q

Creator(s) Qi Li ,Kyle Straub ,Qi Li; Kyle Straub

Abstract: TDB-13-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.17 l/s), sediment (0.00017 l/s), and sea-level rise rate (0.25 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 1000 hr. Experiment was divided into 2 stages. The first stage used a weakly cohesive sediment while the second stage used a moderately cohesive sediment. Both sediment mixtures had wide grain size distributions with a median diameter of 65 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 1 hour of run time.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
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on Jul 26, 2017 7:13:38 PM

Title: TDB_14_2

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0RF5S4H

Creator(s) Qi Li ,Kyle Straub

Abstract: TDB-14-2: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.17 l/s), sediment (0.00017 l/s), and long term sea-level rise rate (0.25 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 1170 hr. Experiment used a strongly cohesive sediment that had a wide grain size distribution with a median diameter of 65 microns. Superimposed on the long term sea-level rise were sea-level cycles. The experiment was split into 2 stages. The first stage had sea-level cycles with periods of 24.5 hrs and amplitudes of 6.125 mm. The second stage had sea-level cycles with periods of 24.5 hrs and amplitudes of 3.06 mm. Experiment performed to explore interaction of autogenic sediment transport with sea-level cycles and resulting stratigraphy with topography monitored every 1 hour of run time.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jul 23, 2017 11:31:16 AM

Title: TDB_14_1

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0MP51D5

Creator(s) Qi Li ,Kyle Straub

Abstract: TDB-14-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.17 l/s), sediment (0.00017 l/s), and long term sea-level rise rate (0.25 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 630 hr. Experiment used a strongly cohesive sediment that had a wide grain size distribution with a median diameter of 65 microns. Superimposed on the long term sea-level rise were sea-level cycles with periods of 98 hrs and amplitudes of 24.5 mm. Experiment performed to explore interaction of autogenic sediment transport with sea-level cycles and resulting stratigraphy with topography monitored every 1 hour of run time.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jul 23, 2017 2:21:36 PM

Title: TDB_15_1

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M00V89W1

Creator(s) Liz Yu ,Kyle Straub

Abstract: TDB-15-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.17 l/s), sediment (0.00017 l/s), and long term sea-level rise rate (0.25 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 1170 hr. Experiment used a strongly cohesive sediment that had a wide grain size distribution with a median diameter of 65 microns. Superimposed on the long term sea-level rise were sea-level cycles. The experiment was split into 2 stages. The first stage had sea-level cycles with periods of 98 hrs and amplitudes of 3.06 mm. The second stage had sea-level cycles with periods of 24.5 hrs and amplitudes of 12.25 mm. Experiment performed to explore interaction of autogenic sediment transport with sea-level cycles and resulting stratigraphy with topography monitored every 1 hour of run time.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jul 22, 2017 7:06:36 PM

Title: TDB-11-1

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0D50K3T

Creator(s) Yinan Wang ,Kyle Straub

Abstract: TDB-11-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.902 l/s), sediment (0.011 l/s), and sea-level rise rate 5 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 77.2 hr. Experiment used non-cohesive sediment that was 70% by volume well sorted quartz sand with a median diameter of 110 microns and 30% by volume crushed coal with a median diameter of 400 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 2 minutes of run time.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Aug 19, 2017 9:55:06 AM

Title: TDB-10-2

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0W37TFH

Creator(s) Yinan Wang ,Kyle Straub

Abstract: TDB-10-2: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.902 l/s), sediment (0.022 l/s), and sea-level rise rate 10 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 39.3 hr. Experiment used non-cohesive sediment that was 70% by volume well sorted quartz sand with a median diameter of 110 microns and 30% by volume crushed coal with a median diameter of 400 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 2 minutes of run time.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Jul 22, 2017 9:03:44 PM

Title: TDB-10-1

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0HX19TT

Creator(s) Yinan Wang ,Kyle Straub

Abstract: TDB-10-1: Fan-delta experiment performed in Tulane University Delta Basin. Experiment evolved under constant forcings of water (0.451 l/s), sediment (0.011 l/s), and sea-level rise rate 5 mm/hr). Experiment run time was 78.2 hr. Experiment used non-cohesive sediment that was 70% by volume well sorted quartz sand with a median diameter of 110 microns and 30% by volume crushed coal with a median diameter of 400 microns. Experiment performed to explore autogenic sediment transport and stratigraphy with topography monitored every 2 minutes of run time.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
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on Jul 21, 2017 10:51:26 AM

Title: Sand on Salt - dune subsidence into a mobile substrate (PDMS)

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M09K487M

Creator(s) Anastasia Piliouras ,Wonsuck Kim

Abstract: This collection contains time-lapse photographs from experiments conducted by A. Piliouras and W. Kim, the results of which are published in Piliouras et al., (2014) in Lithosphere: http://dx.doi.org/10.1130/L323.1. More detailed methodologies can be found in the manuscript. Seismic data from the Gulf of Mexico showed evidence of large lenticular sand bodies (linear dunes) partially subsided into the underlying Louann salt. The dunes were preserved after a marine transgression, and they had variable preserved topographies. We performed experiments to determine what controlled dune subsidence rates and the amount of subsidence, such that we might produce variable subsided dune topographies. The dune here is intended to be a cross section through a linear dune, so it is essentially a triangular pile of sand (silica) deposited relatively instantaneously on top of PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), which we use as a proxy for salt (see references within Piliouras et al., (2014)). Run 1 has a sand to salt thickness ratio of 1 (sand thickness = salt thickness = 14.5 cm), while Run 2 has a ratio of 0.5 (sand thickness = 7.5 cm, salt thickness = 14.5 cm). Here we supply the original time lapse images and corresponding movies, as well as images corrected for camera lens distortion. Run 1 time lapse photos were every 5 minutes, and Run 2 time lapse photos were every 3 minutes. The lens corrected photos have 1 pixel = 1 mm. Flume dimensions can be found in the manuscript listed above to resize and/or process the raw photos.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
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on Mar 16, 2017 3:40:25 PM

Title: Experiments in high-intensity bedload transport

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0G73BP0

Creator(s) Ricardo Hernandez Moreira

Abstract: Herein we present data collected during experiments in high intensity bedload transport. (Refer to http://sedexp.net/experiment/experiments-high-intensity-bedload-transport for more information on the experimental setup). The data are separated as follows: 00-profiles: Water surface and bed elevation profiles. 01-sonar data: Instantaneous realizations of bed elevation fluctuations captured by JSR ultrasonic probes. 02-media: collection of pictures, time-lapses and movies corresponding to the experiments. Data are divided by flow rate (i.e., 20 l/s, 30 l/s), by feed rate (e.g., 1.5 kg/min, 16 kg/min) and by experiment type (i.e. equilibrium or aggradational runs.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
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on Feb 15, 2017 3:30:31 PM

Title: Massive units emplaced by bedload transport in sheet flow mode

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0M043C8

Creator(s) Ricardo Hernandez Moreira

Abstract: Herein we present data collected during experiments on massive deposition in upper regime. (Refer to http://sedexp.net/experiment/experiments-massive-deposits-upper-regime for more information on the experimental setup). The data are separated as follows: 00-profiles: Water surface and bed elevation profiles. 01-sonar data: Instantaneous realizations of bed elevation fluctuations captured by JSR ultrasonic probes. 02-media: collection of pictures, time-lapses and movies corresponding to the experiments. Data are divided by flow rate (i.e., 20 l/s, 30 l/s), by feed rate (e.g., 1.5 kg/min, 8, kg/min, 16 kg/min) and by experiment type (i.e. equilibrium or aggradational runs), wherever appropriate.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
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on Feb 15, 2017 10:52:19 AM

Title: Wave Ripple Time-Lapse Experiments

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0QR4V39

Creator(s) J. Taylor Perron ,Myrow, Paul M. ,Huppert, Kimberly L. ,Koss, Abigail R. ,Andy Wickert

Abstract: Time-lapse animations, timeseries data, and summary data for laboratory wave tank experiments investigating the patterns that form as rippled beds adjust to changes in wave conditions.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sead-int
on Dec 7, 2016 5:08:58 PM

Title: Morphodynamics of mixed bedrock-alluvial systems

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0VH5KTM

Creator(s) Sadegh Jafarinik

Abstract: The data presented here include water surface elevation, Grain size distribution of the bed surface and parent material, bed surface elevation and some videos showing the alluvial-bedrock transitions and Paralaminations. There is also a powerpoint file which explains all the data in details.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
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on Sep 14, 2016 4:50:42 PM

Title: Fold erosion by an antecedent river

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0CF9N3H

Creator(s) Aaron Bufe ,Burbank, Douglas W. ,Paola, Chris

Abstract: This collection contains the photographs and the topographic scans of the experiments published in Bufe A., Paola C., Burbank D.W., 2016. Fluvial bevelling of topography controlled by lateral channel mobility and uplift rate. Nature Geoscience., 9(9), 706-710, doi:10.1038/ngeo2773. For each experiment photographs were taken at regular intervals with a 10.5-mm, f/2.8 fisheye lens mounted on a DSLR camera. Fisheye distortion was removed using the inbuilt lens correction in Photoshop CS6 and were tilted such that the average slope of the alluvial fan is horizontal. Photos taken while the water was not running or when the dye feed was interrupted were not used. Moreover, for Run 4 only photographs from the first 25 h of runtime were processed and uploaded to the repository. All raw unprocessed images can be obtained upon request. Topographic data of the basin were acquired using a custom built laser scanner that was programmed to cover the entire basin except for its upper ~5% (~25 cm), in six swaths. The scans are provided as .dat file and have 4672 by 3001 mm2 sized pixels. To open the datafile in MATLAB : id=fopen(‘filename’,'r') A=fread(id,[4672 3001],'float'); fclose(id); The Metadata for the experiments is summarized in an excel spreadsheet. For each run there are entries about the input parameters as well as the timing of uplift events and the timing of topographic scans. In addition, timelapse videos of each run are included. For each run, the frame rate is 24 frames per second. With 1 minute between each picture, there are 24 min of real time in one second of the video.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
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on Sep 9, 2016 8:26:36 AM

Title: Landscape evolution experiments - hillslope process control on drainage density

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M09P2ZM3

Creator(s) Roering, Joshua ,Sweeney, Kristin ,Ellis, Christopher

Abstract: These data are the raw and processed digital elevation models for the sandbox experiments detailed in "Experimental evidence for hillslope control of landscape scale" by K.E. Sweeney, J.J. Roering, and C. Ellis, which was published in Science in July of 2015. Landscape evolution theory suggests that climate sets the scale of landscape dissection by modulating the competition between diffusive processes that sculpt convex hillslopes and advective processes that carve concave valleys. However, the link between the relative dominance of hillslope and valley transport processes and landscape scale is difficult to demonstrate in natural landscapes due to the episodic nature of erosion. Here we report results from laboratory experiments combining diffusive and advective processes in an eroding landscape. We demonstrate that rainsplash-driven disturbances in our experiments are a robust proxy for hillslope transport, such that increasing hillslope transport efficiency decreases drainage density. Our experimental results demonstrate how the coupling of climate-driven hillslope- and valley-forming processes, such as bioturbation and runoff, dictates the scale of eroding landscapes.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sda
on Aug 16, 2016 9:36:08 AM

Title: Synthetic Bedrock Strength Measurements for Debris Flow Erosion Experiments

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0SQ8XDZ

Creator(s) Leslie Hsu

Abstract: Tensile strength measurements for synthetic bedrock (weak concrete) samples in debris flow erosion experiments at UC Berkeley (Hsu, Dietrich, and Sklar). Additional data includes cement type (I or III), ratio of cement to silica, and dates of pouring and testing.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sda
on Aug 8, 2016 2:36:57 PM

Title: Illgraben bedrock erosion samples

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0XG9P4P

Creator(s) Badoux, Alexandre ,Sklar, L. S. ,Leslie Hsu ,Dietrich, William E. ,McArdell, B. W.

Abstract: Erosion marks on marble and granite bed samples in the Illgraben Torrent (2006-2007). When studying bedrock erosion by a debris flows event, rarely do we know the detailed initial topography of the bedrock channel. This makes it impossible to measure the volume loss due to single debris flow events. To overcome this challenge, we placed initially flat stone samples of marble and granite in the Illgraben torrent, Switzerland, a location frequently scoured by natural debris flows. At the Illgraben, there are typically several events per year, due to the high availability of source material in the upper catchment that fail during summer rain storms (e.g. McArdell et al., 2007; Badoux et al., 2009, Berger, 2011). The stone samples captured groove and impact marks on the stone samples caused by the debris flows.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sda
on Aug 8, 2016 2:32:49 PM

Title: Debris flow flume video (mp4)

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0416V23

Creator(s) Leslie Hsu ,Johnson, Joel, P. ,Dietrich, William E. ,Sklar, Leonard S.

Abstract: Debris-flow flume video clips. Granular flows in a 4-meter diameter, 0.8-meter wide vertically rotating flume to study basal force and erosion beneath debris-flows. The video files are named by [Run ##]_[MMSS_start]-[MMSS_end]_[velocity m/s]. This work was supported by the STC program of the National Science Foundation via the National Center for Earth-surface dynamics under the agreement EAR-0120914.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sda
on Aug 8, 2016 11:20:12 AM

Title: Debris Flow Flume - Bedrock Erosion Data

Persistent ID: http://doi.org/10.5967/M0086399

Creator(s) Leslie Hsu ,Sklar, Leonard S. ,Dietrich, William E.

Abstract: Photos and topographic maps in .mat format of the erosion samples in the Debris Flow Flume. Work originally published in Hsu, Leslie, 2010, Bedrock Erosion by Debris Flows, Ph.D dissertation, University of California, Berkeley. This work was supported by the STC program of the National Science Foundation via the National Center for Earth-surface dynamics under the agreement EAR-0120914.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sda
on Aug 8, 2016 11:20:32 AM

Title: Photogrammetry Technique Manual for the Small and Big Basins

Persistent ID: http://dx.doi.org/10.5967/M0RR1W7P

Creator(s) Braudrick, Christian ,Leverich, Glen

Abstract: Description of the photogrammetry technique for measuring topography in the Small and Big Basins of the Richmond Field Station, University of California, Berkeley.

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sda
on May 9, 2016 6:20:26 PM

Title: Density Current Confluence Velocity Data

Persistent ID: http://dx.doi.org/10.5967/M0WH2N0V

Creator(s) Imran,Jasim ,Ismail,Hassan ,Viparelli,Enrica

Abstract: Data collected and processed by H. Ismail et al during density current confluence experiments at the University of South Carolina Hydraulics Lab (2013-2015). In all files, x, y, and z denote down-stream, cross-channel, and vertical coordinates, respectively. The origin is the upstream junction point on the flume bed. u and v denote velocity in the x and y directions, respectively. U and H are depth-averaged velocity and current thickness, respectively. "vertical-profiles-u.xlsx" contains down-stream (u) velocity versus distance from the bed at 9 locations along the main channel centerline. "horizontal-u.xlsx" and "horizontal-v.xlsx" contain measurements of down-stream (u) and cross-channel (v) data at 3000 data points located on five horizontal planes in the vicinity of the junction in the main channel. "layer-averaged.xlsx" contains computed depth-averaged velocity and current thickness for each profile defined by the data in "vertical-profiles-u.xlsx".

Published: from Sediment Experimentalist Network to
sda
on May 9, 2016 6:05:06 PM

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